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Eli Montaigue

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Eli Montaigue

(Erle's son, and now leader of the WTBA)

Eli Montaigue

Eli Montaigue is the head of the World Taiji Boxing Association, and was named as the successor by Erle to the Erle Montaigue system of fighting and healing.

He was graded Master Degree in 2010.

Eli has been studying the internal arts most of his life. Having been home schooled by his wonderful parents Erle and Sandy, he was surrounded by the arts from a baby. So growing up, mainly on big farms in Australia, Taiji and Bagua was more or less a normal part of life., Eli was 4 years old, when he started in Taiji, As he grew up, Erle would every so often show him a little technique of some sort while play fighting, so he was training in the arts with-out really thinking about it.

So when it came time for him to start training seriously as he got older, he already had a good grounding from which to build from, and a good understanding of the art, and having been home schooled all his life, he already had a loose relaxed body, and a calm stress free mind.

Eli started training seriously when he was 14 years old, Erle starting teaching him, and his brother and sister, every morning at around 7am, the Old Yang Style, normally just one move a day, as Erle was teaching his own children, he wanted them to learn every move perfectly, so they learnt the form very slowly and detailed, it took about 4 years to get to the end of the Taiji form, with all the rest in between of course, the Pauchui form, small San-Sau, Push Hands, Bagua, etc etc etc.

Eli kept up these classes for a few years, learning all the aspects of the arts.

Then the three children started learning in their own time, Eli would either ask Erle for the next move of whatever he was training in at the time, as he always had practically 24 hour access to him. Always doing lots of Push Hands etc, anywhere, at home or in the street.

When Eli was about 17 and big enough, he became Erle's main training partner, and assistant teacher, travelling with Erle to all his workshops around the world, training and also learning how to teach. 

Eli started up his own classes when he was 18 years old, and from those few classes, he started doing workshops internationally as Erle's main representative. 
Eli trained with Erle nearly every day from age 14 till 24.
Their last training session was only about an hour before Erle passed.


Eli now runs the wtba, he has a training retreat in Malta where people come to stay for intensive training from all over the world to get one to one tuition. He run's multiple workshops all over Europe, and the rest of the world, and has also taught the system to an undercover special forces division of the French Navy.

Eli has been teaching this system for 16 years now, (2018)
Although he is still young at age 31, unlike most people who train in a group class a few times a week and get very little hands on time with their teacher, Eli lived with his teacher and received one to one hands on tuition almost every day while we was learning. 
From about the age of 4 till 13 Eli did some training here and there but was not taking it too seriously. 
It was at age 14 that he started training with his father every day.
Along with his here and there training as a child, Eli's main training was from age 14 till 24, training with Erle one to one almost every day, they even had a good sparing session the morning of the day Erle died. 

Erle handed all of this down to Eli in his lifetime, and named Eli as his successor a few years before he died in 2011.

Eli now leads the WTBA, travelling all over the world to give seminars in any of the 27 countries where there are WTBA schools set up, as well as being invited to teach in other schools around the world.

Eli’s main focus in his training is to become the best teacher he can be, spending hours working on new ways of breaking down the principles of movement to make them easier to understand.

Due to this students have found the learning curve cut in half when training with Eli, he has a way of explaining things in plain English so everyone can understand.